Kathryn Fox

Assistant Professor

  • Faculty
  • Department of Psychology
  • College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

What I do

Dr. Fox is an Assistant Professor in the clinical child psychology Ph.D. Program and directs the Fox Lab in DU's Department of Psychology.

Specialization(s)

self-harm, LGBTQIA, adolescents

Professional Biography

Kathryn received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the Harvard Clinical Science program in 2019 after she completed a predoctoral internship at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic.

The primary goal of Kathryn's research is to improve the understanding and treatment of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (broadly defined) and to help reduce these behaviors on a large-scale. Her research takes multiple approaches toward this aim, including summarizing existing research on this topic, conducting experimental and longitudinal studies of risk, and designing and testing novel and scalable treatments for these outcomes. Her research increasingly seeks to understand risk among adolescents and people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) because these self-injurious thoughts and behaviors tend to be particularly prevalent among these populations.

In addition to her focus on research, Kathryn prioritizes mentoring and training graduate and undergraduate students in both research methods and professional development. She strives to inspire students to develop and test their own research questions using the methods best suited to answer those questions. Kathryn also works to disseminate her research to broader audiences. Suicide and self-harming behaviors tend to be stigmatized, and this is in part because people struggle to understand why people engage in these damaging behaviors. Through education of community members and treatment providers, she hopes to reduce these negative attitudes and increase understanding.

Degree(s)

  • Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Harvard University, 2019
  • MA, Clinical Psychology, Harvard University, 2015
  • BS, Cognitive Studies and Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 2011

Research

The primary goal of my research is to improve the understanding and treatment of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (broadly defined) and to help reduce these behaviors on a large-scale. My research takes multiple approaches toward this aim, including summarizing existing research on this topic, conducting experimental and longitudinal studies of risk, and designing and testing novel and scalable treatments for these outcomes.

Because these thoughts and behaviors are particularly prevalent among adolescents and people identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ), my research increasingly focuses on these populations.

Toward this end, my lab conducts research on the following topics:
1. Examining mechanisms underlying self-injurious thoughts and behaviors using experimental designs
2. Implementing data-driven approaches to better understand classification of self-injurious behaviors, broadly defined
3. Examining risk and protective factors for psychopathology and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors among adolescents and people identifying as LGBTQ
4. Designing and implementing novel treatment and prevention programs
5. Testing and updating what we currently know about predicting and preventing self-injurious thoughts and behaviors using meta-analytic methods

Featured Publications

Model Complexity Improves the Prediction of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury. (2019). Model Complexity Improves the Prediction of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury. JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 87(8), 684-692.
Why Does Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Improve Mood? A Preliminary Test of Three Hypotheses. (2017). Why Does Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Improve Mood? A Preliminary Test of Three Hypotheses. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 5(1), 111-121.
Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors May Be More Common and Severe Among People Identifying as a Sexual Minority. (2018). Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors May Be More Common and Severe Among People Identifying as a Sexual Minority. BEHAVIOR THERAPY, 49(5), 768-780.
A Brief Mobile App Reduces Nonsuicidal and Suicidal Self-Injury: Evidence From Three Randomized Controlled Trials. (2016). A Brief Mobile App Reduces Nonsuicidal and Suicidal Self-Injury: Evidence From Three Randomized Controlled Trials. JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 84(6), 544-557.
Meta-analysis of risk factors for nonsuicidal self-injury. (2015). Meta-analysis of risk factors for nonsuicidal self-injury. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, 42, 156-167.

Awards

  • Certificate of Distinction and Excellence in Teaching, Derek Bok Center/Harvard University