Paige Lloyd

Paige Lloyd

Assistant Professor

What I do

Assistant professor

Specialization(s)

prejudice, and discrimination

Professional Biography

Paige Lloyd is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department. Lloyd completed her graduate training at Miami University and undergraduate training at Wittenberg University. Lloyd's research program investigates the determinants and consequences of person perception, with an emphasis on implications for social inequality and discrimination. As a mentor, Lloyd works closely with undergraduate and graduate collaborators to facilitate student led research examining inequality in domains of health care, policing, criminal justice, and education. Lloyd is also a committed educator with a focus on first exposures to psychology (i.e., Foundations of Psychology) and the active role of students in scientific inquiry (i.e., Research Methods in Psychology).

Degree(s)

  • Ph.D., Psychology, Miami University, 2018
  • MA, Psychology, Miami University, 2015
  • BS, Psychology, Wittenberg University, 2013

Research

We form impressions of others with surprising ease, and with shockingly little information. Others' faces, bodies, and language all command attention, combining to provide rich impressions of others' traits, emotional states, motives, and social status. But not all cues are created equal, and similarly, not all people are treated equally. Our lab investigates the determinants and consequences of person perception, with an emphasis on implications for social inequality and discrimination.

Featured Publications

Lloyd, E. P., Hugenberg, K., McConnell, A. R., Kunstman, J. W., & Deska, J. C. (2017). Black and White lies: Race-based biases in deception judgments. Psychological Science, 28(8), 1125-1136.
Lloyd, E. P., Deska, J. C., Hugenberg, K., McConnell, A. R., Humphrey, B. T., & Kunstman, J. W. (2018). Miami University deception detection database. Behavior Research Methods, 51(1), 429–439.
Deska, J. C., Lloyd, E. P., & Hugenberg, K. (2018). Facing humanness: Facial width-to-height ratio predicts ascriptions of humanity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 114(1), 75-94.
Deska, J. C., Lloyd, E. P., & Hugenberg, K. (2017). The face of fear and anger: Facial width-to-height ratio biases recognition of angry and fearful expressions. Emotion, 18(3), 453-464.
Lloyd, E. P., Kunstman, J. W., Tuscherer, T., & Bernstein, M. J. (2017). The Face of Suspicion: Suspicion of Whites' Motives Moderates Mental Representations of Whites. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 8(8), 953-960.