Michelle Rozenman

Assistant Professor

What I do

Dr. Rozenman is an Assistant Professor in the clinical child psychology Ph.D. Program and directs the BRAVE Lab in DU's Department of Psychology.

Specialization(s)

clinical psychology; children; adolescents

Professional Biography

Dr. Rozenman received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, and completed a predoctoral internship and postdoctoral T32 fellowship at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior. She subsequently held a faculty position in the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, where she conducted research and served as Associate Director of UCLA Health's Pediatric OCD Intensive Outpatient Program. Dr. Rozenman joined the faculty at DU in Fall 2018.

Dr. Rozenman's research centers on elucidating processes that underlie anxiety and related disorders in children and adolescents in order to develop theoretically and practically efficient interventions. Currently, her work includes:
(1) assessment and experimental modification of cognitive bias,
(2) studying the interplay of cognitive and psychophysiological processes in anxiety expression,
and (3) development and evaluation of behavioral interventions for anxiety and related problems in youth.

Together, this work aims to link mechanisms and interventions research to improve the evidence base for pediatric anxiety interventions that have potential for translation into settings outside of the laboratory.

Dr. Rozenman is a licensed clinical psychologist in Colorado and a clinical supervisor in the Child and Family Clinic in the DU Department of Psychology.

Degree(s)

  • Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, 2013
  • MS, SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, 2009
  • BA, University of California Los Angeles, 2005

Licensure / Accreditations

  • Licensed Psychologist

Research

Anxiety is the most common mental health problem across the lifespan, and typically begins during the pediatric period. Dr. Rozenman's research centers on understanding processes that underlie anxiety in children and adolescents in order to develop theoretically and practically efficient interventions. This includes 1) assessment and experimental modification of threat-based thinking patterns (cognitive biases), 2) studying the interplay of cognitive and psychophysiological processes in anxiety expression, and 3) development and evaluation of behavioral interventions for anxiety and related problems in youth. Together, this work aims to link mechanisms and interventions research to improve the evidence-base for pediatric anxiety interventions that have potential for translation into clinical and community settings. Dr. Rozenman has been funded by federal, institutional, and private foundations to conduct this work.