Denver School of Forms & Poetics

July 13–25, 2022

The Denver School of Forms and Poetics, a summer program of the Department of English and Literary Arts at the University of Denver (DU), focuses on aesthetic forms and critical poetics. It provides a forum for the exploration of the unique as well as the interactive capabilities of creative writing and literary studies.

In four- and six-hour seminars over a two week period (June 13–25), DU and guest faculty, many of them significant voices in their fields, discuss creative ideas and critical approaches with imagination and insight. Cosmopolitan and innovatory in character, the aims of the Denver School of Forms and Poetics include the interdisciplinary expansion of intellectual boundaries and transcultural studies of form and meaning. 

Advanced seniors contemplating graduate studies and graduate students already furthering their professional development are bound to find the experience particularly helpful. So too will high school teachers and all individuals principally interested in knowledge as well as a dynamic vision of the world.

Among other benefits, the Denver School of Forms and Poetics helps students develop a robust critical education that aligns with their creative education, or vice versa, and current literary practices. It also facilitates access to enriching ideas and methods, engaging faculty and engaged participants, and a blend of curricular and co-curricular activities.

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Program Highlights

  • Seminars & Mini-Seminars

    Seminars & Mini-Seminars

  • Guest Lectures

    Guest Lectures

  • Guest Readings

    Guest Readings

  • Special Sessions

    Special Sessions

  • Conferences

    Conferences

Seminars

Clark Davis

The Imagination of Fact

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Clark Davis 

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Eric Gould

The Poetics of Myth

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Eric Gould

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R.D. Perry

Fragments, Ruins, and Things Left Unwritten

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. R.D. Perry

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Bin Ramke

Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic: Poetry for All

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Bin Ramke

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Adam Rovner

Form & Function:

An Introduction to Narrative Theory

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Adam Rovner

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Selah Saterstrom

Writing the Impossible:

A Generative Workshop

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Selah Saterstrom

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Billy Stratton

Creative Criticism

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Billy J. Stratton

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Lindsay Turner

How to Do Things with Prosody

6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Lindsay Turner

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Vincent James

Visual Ecstasies:

Contemporary Ekphrasis (and All that Follows)

6 hours (6 hours, with breaks, F) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Vincent James

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Dr. Maik Nwosu

The Migrant Muse and the New Diasporas

6 hours (6 hours, with breaks, F) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Maik Nwosu

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Sheila Carter-Tod

Race and Rhetoric(s)

4 hours (2 hours per session, F) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Sheila Carter-Tod

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Kristy Ulibarri

Necropolitics and Latinidad

4 hours (2 hours per session, F) | Modality: HYFLEX
Dr. Kristy L. Ulibarri

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Register

Ready to immerse yourself in the study and creation of literature and aesthetics across styles, forms and cultures? Register now through the link below.

Register Here

Tuition

The total cost for this two-week summer program is $1,200. Applications for one week of the program will also be considered at a rate of $600. A tuition discount of 10 percent is available to DU alumni, veterans and early registrants who submit applications by May 13.

About the Program

The Denver School of Forms & Poetics offers a rare chance for students to grow their creative and critical skills while also developing greater intercultural sensitivity and emotional intelligence, skills that align with DU's Impact 2025 plan to develop artists, educators, professionals and leaders who use their scholarly abilities to advance the public good.

Seminar Descriptions and Faculty Biographies

  • The Imagination of Fact | Dr. Clark Davis

    The Imagination of Fact 

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Clark Davis

    Course Description

    This seminar will take up the difficult question of what counts as a fact in literary production and how it relates to a work’s presentation of truth.

    What, for instance, is the role of the factual in a book like Moby-Dick, where facts are deployed for many different reasons and in many different ways—but arguably always in service of a largely conceived “truth”? How does the fact function in the historical novel? Or the fictionalized biographical portrait? And what might this analysis of the use of fact in imaginative literature tell us about works that we label as “non-fiction”?

    We will look closely at examples from a variety of writers, including Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Eduard Mörike, James Boswell, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James, and others.

    Faculty Biography

    Clark Davis came to DU in 2000. His primary areas of interest include early and nineteenth-century American literature, particularly the New England tradition. He regularly teaches courses on the American Puritans, early American poetics, the Transcendentalists, and the American novel and short story.

    Prof. Davis’s research has been devoted primarily to major figures of the mid-nineteenth century, Melville and Hawthorne in particular. In recent years, however, he has devoted more time to the twentieth century, completing the first full-length literary biography of William Goyen, author of The House of Breath and Arcadio.

  • The Poetics of Myth | Dr. Eric Gould

    The Poetics of Myth

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Eric Gould

    Course Description

    Myth means several different things, but in the end it is only one thing: a shareable, cultural narrative that we consider to be important for some reason.

    It can be a genre of anonymous folklore tales or traditional stories, often supernatural, that attempt to explain the world and the beginnings, middles, and ends of human experience. Native American mythology and the Australian Aboriginal Dreamtime are examples of this. It can also be a narrative that talks about how particular products or people are “awesome” in terms of their reputation.

    The word “myth” can also have a pejorative meaning when it is a story that is deemed to be untrue and non-factual, a story whose importance to us is determined by how wrong it is. Political chatter perhaps? Or any stories that are not worth believing in.

    This is one of the paradoxes of myth: that it is at once a fantasy that contains an important truth for broadly symbolic reasons. Or it can be a story that is patently untrue and needs to repudiated. But in every instance, myth is a narrative: it is language in action telling a story.

    When we talk about the poetics of myth, we are talking about how those narratives work as language, how they and we readers make meaning, how they try to link nature and culture, such as the story of how the jaguar brought fire to the Baroro Indians of South America.

    As stories, traditional myths can themselves often be considered literary since they get re-used and rewritten in later literary texts. They can be narratives that have anthropological and cultural significance. Literature in turn can intend to be mythic by reusing these stories or even by pushing the limits of language to explore a human mystery. The boundary lines between myth and literature in other words are quite porous.

    That is what we will explore in this seminar, as we read stories that have been told in order to understand the way the world and even language itself works.

    Faculty Biography

    Eric Gould’s main fields of teaching and research are in 20th and 21st century literature (with an emphasis on fiction) and cultural studies. He graduated with BA and MA (Hons) degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and with the PhD in English from King’s College London. Apart from teaching in the English program at the University of Denver, and chairing the department twice, he has held several administrative positions, including Vice President for Academic Affairs (at Drew University, New Jersey), Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies at DU, and Vice Provost for Internationalization at DU.

    He is the author/editor of eight books, and his work has appeared in a number of journals, including The Times Literary Supplement, the Times Higher Education Supplement, The New York Times Book Review, Substance, and Higher Education in Europe. His first book was called Mythical Intentions in Modern Literature (Princeton 1983). His most recent book, The University in a Corporate Culture (Yale 2003), won the 2004 Frandson Prize for Literature. He is currently working on a book-length project about the internationalization of academe.

  • Fragments, Ruins, and Things Left Unwritten | Dr. R.D. Perry

    Fragments, Ruins, and Things Left Unwritten

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. R.D. Perry

    Course Description

    Incomplete literary works are ubiquitous, although there are various causes for their incompleteness. Sometimes, history and the vagaries of transmission cause us to lose texts, either completely or in part.

    Such is often the case with older works, like the fragments left to us by Sappho, or the Old English poem “The Ruin,” which is about ruins but is also itself ruined. Other times, authors leave their own works unfinished, either by choice or due to forces beyond their control. Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston never brought their play, Mule Bone, to a conclusion due to their personal conflicts and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s opium-addled memory prevented him from writing any more of “Kubla Khan.”

    What’s more, incomplete literary works have a variety of effects. These works can present something of a challenge to scholarship: our assumptions about works of art tend to favor those that are finished, allowing us to understand how their different parts relate to the whole. Works without that clear sense of completion—like Franz Kafka’s novels and their relationship to some of his shorter prose pieces—lead to uncertainty about the boundaries of the work and even—as in Kafka’s case—lawsuits.

    These same works of art, though, have also served as inspiration: different authors will often attempt to bring the works to completion, creating new works out of the old. Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales gave rise to a veritable industry of continuations, from the fifteenth century to the last decade.

    This seminar will work to make something out of fragmentary, ruined, or incomplete works. We will discuss strategies for understanding them aesthetically and what opportunities they may afford us creatively. Rather than see these works as a cause for lamentation, we will them use them as a source for our own creative and critical explorations.

    Faculty Biography

    R. D. Perry received his PhD from the University of California Berkeley in English and Medieval Studies, with a Designated Emphasis in Critical Theory. He is currently working on two books, one on the importance of coterie poetics for the formation of the English literary tradition and one on the aesthetics of incompleteness in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.

    His essays have been published or are forthcoming in Literature and Medicine, Studies in the Age of Chaucer, Speculum, and Poetics Today. He is also working on essays related to mid-20th century intellectual culture, Hannah Arendt, and Immanuel Kant.

  • Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic: Poetry for All | Dr. Bin Ramke

    Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic: Poetry for All

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Bin Ramke

    Course Description

    Well, not so much arithmetic as certain ideas from “higher” mathematics that might as well be poetry.

    We will read and write, and think about such things as what John Conway’s “The Game of Life” can teach us about how words work. Most of our thinking during these three days will happen on the page, through collaborations and individual work responding to prompts given by me, prompts which, like any real mathematics as well, take us to surprising results.

    We will also think about etymologies, the individual stories of individual words through history, which means noticing how language is a kind of geometry, a measure of the very land it lives on. But at no time will we expect two and two to make four.

    Faculty Biography

    Bin Ramke, former editor of a literary journal and a poetry book series, teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Denver where he holds the Phipps Chair and is a Distinguished Professor. During his childhood in the south he intended to become a mathematician, and then a sculptor, but after majoring in English at LSU he eventually received a PhD in modern literature from Ohio University.

    He taught in Columbus, Georgia prior to arriving at the University of Denver in 1985. For many years he taught fall terms at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His first book won the Yale Younger Poets Award, and he has since published thirteen more books of poems, most recently Earth on Earth (Omnidawn, 2021).

  • Form & Function: An Introduction to Narrative Theory | Dr. Adam Rovner

    Form & Function: An Introduction to Narrative Theory

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Adam Rovner

    Course Description

    This seminar presents an introduction to critical methods associated with classical narrative theory. We will trace the development of narrative theory from Russian Formalism through to Structuralism and Narratology. Our focus will be on defining and understanding “literariness”—that which makes a given work a work of literature.

    Students will read seminal work from thinkers identified with these varied yet interwoven critical approaches, and will consider the diachronic development of narrative theory. Through lectures, discussion, and “laboratory” work, participants will learn to apply the tools of these methodologies to the interpretation of literary texts.

    Influential theorists we will consider include: Viktor Shklovsky, Roman Jakobson, Boris Eikhenbaum, Jan Mukarovsky, Tzvetan Todorov, Roland Barthes, Gérard Genette, and Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan.

    Faculty Biography

    Adam Rovner is Associate Professor of English and Jewish Literature. He came to DU in 2008 after serving as Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Director of the Hebrew Program at Hofstra University (2006-08). Adam received his MA in comparative literature from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1998) and his PhD from Indiana University-Bloomington (2003).

    His articles, essays, translations and interviews have appeared in numerous scholarly journals and general interest publications. His book, In the Shadow of Zion: Promised Lands Before Israel, was published by NYU Press (2014). He is quite possibly the only person ever to have had a peer-reviewed article also win a science fiction award. In 2015, he served as a Lady Davis Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. 

  • Writing the Impossible: A Generative Workshop | Selah Saterstrom

    Writing the Impossible: A Generative Workshop

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Selah Saterstrom

    Course Description

    In this three-day workshop, through a variety of modes and experiments, we will generate new work.

    How can we enter difficult or complex material when the task seems overwhelming? Where do we begin and how do we keep going? How do we move into the space of writing “big themes” – loss, recovery, transformation – when the largeness of such themes can feel intimidating?

    In this generative workshop, will work with writing strategies that harness the energy of material that might otherwise feel impossible. All genres welcome.

    Faculty Biography 

    Selah Saterstrom is the author of three novels Slab, The Meat and Spirit Plan, and The Pink Institution, all published by Coffee House Press.

    She is also the author of a collection of hybrid essays, Ideal Suggestions: Essays in Divinatory Poetics, which was awarded the Essay Press Book Award in 2017. She is the Director of Creative Writing at the University of Denver.

  • Creative Criticism | Dr. Billy J. Stratton

    Creative Criticism

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Billy J. Stratton 

    Course Description

    This seminar explores the dynamic interplay between creativity and modes of literary analysis and textual interpretation.

    Considering acts of strategic disruption and decolonization, along with the dance of meaning that stems from the play of language as a fertile starting point we will explore the possibilities of a practice of literary criticism that seeks an engagement with texts in more authentic, honest, responsive, and reflective ways.

    Discussions and short readings will be drawn from a wide variety of sources in which native/indigenous writers, scholars, poets, and storiers including Gerald Vizenor, Gordon Henry, Stephen Graham Jones, and Layli Long Soldier will be placed in critical conversation with theorists and philosophers such as Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard, Frantz Fanon, Julia Kristeva, Umberto Eco, Jean-François Lyotard, and Slavoj Žižek among others.

    The anticipated result will be to invigorate an exploration of the constraints and limitations imposed by western/conventional modes of thinking and being as a means of facilitating a lively consideration of ways that we might challenge and overcome the tyranny implicit in dominant regimes of knowledge and meaning-making experiences as they relate to the creation, presence, and interpretation of literary artifacts.

    Faculty Biography

    Billy J. Stratton studied literature and philosophy at Miami University before earning a doctorate in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona—among the first thirty in the discipline worldwide, while also being a Fulbright Scholar in Julius-Maximilians-Universität Wüzburg, Germany.

    He has taught courses that span native American/contemporary American literature, native and indigenous studies, apocalypse, dystopian, new west and southern gothic literature, posthumanism, writing, and film studies. He has published widely on captivity narratives, colonialism, war, and native critical theory, while his criticism and commentary have appeared in such venues as American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Arizona Quarterly, Journal of American Culture, Los Angeles Review of Books, Rhizomes, Transmotion, and Wíčazo Ša Review, as well as The Hill, History News Network, Indian Country Today, Salon, Time, and US News and World Report.

    His first book, Buried in Shades of Night, was published in 2013 and garnered much positive critical attention, while his latest project, The Fictions of Stephen Graham Jones: A Critical Companion, was published by the University of New Mexico Press in November 2016. He is currently at work on a novel set in Appalachian coal country—a sample from which can be found in Big Muddy (18:1 2018).

  • How to Do Things with Prosody | Dr. Lindsay Turner

    How to Do Things with Prosody

    6 hours (2 hours daily, TWR) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Lindsay Turner

    Course Description

    Prosody—the system of classifying and studying poetic meter—has a terribly unfortunate reputation as the stuff of old-school sticklers and chalk-dusty professors. But this is unfair!

    In this session, we’ll start with the basics of prosody, learning the complicated but not impossible system of scansion for accentual-syllabic verse in English. From here, we’ll think together about the subtle metrical tricks—the flipped feet, shortened lines, and triple- meter skips, for example—that leave us breathless in poems, that make us weep or smile, and that give each poem its unique music.

    We’ll read poems by poets from Emily Dickinson and John Keats to Edgar Allen Poe and Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss) to a diverse selection of contemporary poets who experiment with form and rhythm. Students will have a chance to write poems of their own as well.

    Faculty Biography 

    Lindsay Turner’s first book of poems, Songs & Ballads, was published in 2018 by Prelude Books. Her translations from the French include the poetry collections The Next Loves (Stéphane Bouquet, Nightboat Books 2019) and adagio ma non troppo (Ryoko Sekiguchi, Les Figues 2018) and the philosophy books Postcolonial Bergson (Souleymane Bachir Diagne, Fordham University Press 2019) and Atopias (Frédéric Neyrat, Fordham University Press 2019, co-translated with Walt Hunter).

    Her critical and review essays have appeared in journals including ASAP / Journal, Contemporary Women’s Writing, Lana Turner Journal, Boston Review, and Los Angeles Review of Books. She holds an AB in English from Harvard College, a master’s in film studies from the Université Paris III Sorbonne-Nouvelle, an MFA in creative writing (poetry) from New York University, and a PhD in English from the University of Virginia. Originally from northeast Tennessee, she lives in Denver and teaches in the Department of English and Literary Arts at the University of Denver.

  • Visual Ecstasies: Contemporary Ekphrasis (and All that Follows) | Dr. Vincent James

    Visual Ecstasies: Contemporary Ekphrasis (and All that Follows)

    6 hours (6 hours, with breaks, F) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Vincent James

    Course Description 

    "Ekphrasis”—a languaged engagement with visual art—carries a rich poetic lineage. It also, as a contemporary literary practice, offers expansive critical and artistic vistas.

    While historical ekphrasis emphasized a one-way transmission from the source work to the inspired text, recent feminist perspectives envision ekphrasis away from “an oppositional structure of dominance” and toward “dynamic figurative, metonymic, and discursive forms” (Fischer).

    In this six-hour seminar, we will explore these new visions for ekphrasis in contemporary creative writing. Informed by excerpts of scholarship from B.K. Fischer, Genevieve Kaplan, Renate Brosch, and Lilane Louvel, our conversations will take up: obsession and sustained contemplation, inter-arts hybridity, models of derivation vs. reciprocal autonomy, instinctual response, digital complexities, and the exposed process of art-making in the work of Carmen Giménez Smith, Mary-Jo Bang, John Ashbery, Janice Lee, Kevin Young, Nathalie Léger, and Orchid Tierney.

    Following our initial four hours of lecture and discussion, the final two hours will be dedicated to a workshop-style writing studio, where students will have the opportunity to engage with a vibrant assemblage of visual and sonic work and respond from an ekphrastic posture.

    Faculty Biography

    Vincent James is the author of Swerve (Astrophil Press, 2021), Acacia, a Book of Wonders (Texas Review Press, 2023), and the chapbook, Rady, or Squirrelhunter (Ravenna Press, 2021). James earned a PhD in English & Creative Writing from the University of Denver, where he served as the Associate Editor and Managing Editor of Denver Quarterly.

    Currently, he lectures at Colorado School of Mines and in the low-res MFA at Naropa’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. James is a Contributing Editor to FivesQuarterly.com. Alongside his daughters, Lola and Daisy, he makes collages under the name, Rara Avis.

  • The Migrant Muse and the New Diasporas | Dr. Maik Nwosu

    The Migrant Muse and the New Diasporas

    6 hours (6 hours, with breaks, F) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Maik Nwosu

    Course Description

    In the beginning there was a river. The river became a road and the road branched out to the whole world. And because the road was once a river it was always hungry. — Ben Okri, The Famished Road

    This seminar examines the movement of people from one locality to another, especially across borders, as well as consequent experiences — including reception and dis/integration in receiving countries.

    Referencing different regions of the world such as Africa and the African Diaspora, Europe, Asia, and America, we will discuss the nature and effects of migration from different perspectives, such as historical, socioeconomic, and literary/artistic.

    Because the movement of people is related to the movement of history and the transformative character of the imagination, we will explore migration and diaspora narratives, which provide insights into a contemporary phe-nomenon that traces a path back to the earliest history of humanity.

    Faculty Biography

    Maik Nwosu is Professor of English specializing in African, African Diaspora, post-colonial, and world literatures; semiotics and critical theory. He worked as a journalist (and received the Nigeria Media Merit Award for Journalist of the Year) before moving to Syracuse University, New York for a PhD in English and Textual Studies.

    Nwosu is a fellow of the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart, Germany; the Civitella Ranieri Center, Umbertide, Italy; and the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study, Stellenbosch, South Africa. He is also a member of the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars.

    Nwosu’s published works include fiction (A Gecko’s Fare-well, Alpha Song, Invisible Chapters, and Return to Algadez), poetry (Suns of Kush), a coedited anthology (The Critical Imagination in African Literature: Essays in Honor of Michael J. C. Echeruo), and critical studies (The Comic Imagination in Modern African Literature and Cinema: A Poetics of Laughter and Markets of Memories: Between the Postcolonial and the Transnational).

     

  • Race and Rhetoric(s) | Dr. Sheila Carter-Tod

    Race and Rhetoric(s)

    4 hours (2 hours per session, F) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Sheila Carter-Tod

    Course Description

    This seminar will explore the intersections of rhetoric and race by focusing on various themes and dimensions for understanding race as a discursive concept that so profoundly impacts our society, culture, and public discourse.

    By looking at the rhetoric(s) of race, we will theorize, critique, and apply ways of communicating about race and racialization—linguistically, socially and educationally. We will identify and analyze “race" as rhetorically constructed and situated socio-historically, as well as explore critical theories of race, racialization, and racism in written communication and Writing Studies pedagogy and practices.

    Faculty Biography

    Sheila Carter-Tod joined DU this fall (2021) as the Executive Director of Writing Programs and Associate Professor of English. She formerly directed both the Composition Program and Curricular and Pedagogical Development in the College Access Collaborative at Virginia Tech. She has chaired the NCTE’s Racism and Bias committee and held leadership roles on CCC and CWPA’s executive and editorial boards.

    She has published works in College Composition and Communication, Enculturation, Composition Studies, Council of Journal of Writing Program Administration and others, as well as numerous chapters in books and textbooks. Her research/teaching/service/outreach focuses on writing program administration, cultural rhetoric(s), composition theory, language and access, and writing pedagogy

  • Necropolitics and Latinidad | Dr. Kristy L. Ulibarri

    Necropolitics and Latinidad

    4 hours (2 hours per session, F) | Modality: HYFLEX (Zoom and In-Person)

    Dr. Kristy L. Ulibarri

    Course Description 

    This four-hour seminar will consider the economies of death, social death, and slow death within performances and texts of latinidad.

    The historical mythos and cultural celebrations around death hailing from Mexico and Latin America have entered the U.S. marketplace of ideas through la calavera catrina images, La Llorona/ White Lady folklore, and fetishizations of dia de los muertos. Simultaneously, these cultural forms of death have come up against discourses and practices of imperial, racial, and economic violence against Latinos in the U.S., violences that Achille Mbembe argues make certain populations into the “living dead.”

    The uneven and contradictory formation of “death” here will lead us to investigate select contemporary U.S. literary and visual forms – such as comic books, migrant narratives, literary-musical hybrid, and adaptations – that employ figures of the dead and reveal these problematic cultural and social circulations.

    We will address the following questions: How do these literary forms and narratives construct “death”? Why must figurations of the dead or the living dead encode/decode social inequality and the violence of late capitalism? What sorts of imagination does the dead destroy or create?

    Faculty Biography

    Kristy L. Ulibarri received her PhD in English Studies from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research and teaching primarily concentrate on Latinx literature and culture, im/migrant narratives, speculative fiction, and cultural studies.

    She is currently working on a book manuscript titled Visible Borders, Invisible Economies: The Living Dead of Latinx Narratives, which delineates the relationship between contemporary Latinx cultural production, free-market economies, and national security in the U.S. under NAFTA. Her work appears or is forthcoming in the Routledge Companion to Lati-no/a Literature, Latino Studies, Feminist Review, Art Journal, and Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies.

Interested in the University of Denver?