What is DUMA?

The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology (DUMA) is dedicated to increasing knowledge and understanding of world cultures and human diversity. The Museum emphasizes the ethical stewardship of collections, research, teaching, educational programming and responsible community engagement. DUMA supports the Department of Anthropology's emphasis on applied and public anthropology in service to the common good.

The museum acknowledges that colonial legacies are embedded in anthropological collections. It strives to address historical wrongs by building collaborative, reciprocal relationships and respecting the rights and cultural protocol of communities represented in the collection.

 

 

Current and Upcoming Exhibits

We are sorry, but due to concerns for the health of our community the gallery will remain closed until further notice.

Many of our collection items can be viewed digitally on our online collections database.

Explore Collections

DU Covid-19 Response

 

Upcoming Events

 

Student Involvement

students at indigenous film & arts fest

DUMA provides a hands-on learning experience for students and works closely with the Master's level Museum and Heritage Studies program in Anthropology. Alongside faculty and staff mentors, students conduct research and learn about the ethics of interpretation and stewardship. Students curate exhibits showcased in the museum’s gallery and display cases, and assist with projects related to collections care.

DUMA Exhibits

Our exhibits showcase student and faculty anthropology research, as well as collaborations with campus organizations and community partners. The museum’s gallery on the first floor of Sturm Hall and exhibit cases on the first and second floors house our physical exhibits, while virtual exhibits are archived online.

Explore Our Exhibits

DUMA Collections

Home to more than 100,000 unique ethnographic and archaeological artifacts, DUMA’s collections include Southwestern pottery, African and Native American textiles, masks from around the world, and remarkably well-preserved yucca fiber and animal hide footwear from cave sites in Colorado.

Access Our Collections
background image, indigenous art

DUMA’s Work with Tribal Nations

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) provides a process for tribes to request the return of items from museums and federal agencies. Along with implementing NAGPRA at the museum, we are engaging with other practitioners to further repatriation work and foster stronger relationships across the field.

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DUMA News

CAHSS Staff Interviews
CAHSS Staff Interview: Anne Amati

Get to know NAGPRA Coordinator for the Department of Anthropology and Staff Committee President Anne Amati.

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Kelly Fayard
Faculty Explores Issues in Native American Communities

DU’s Anthropology Department welcomes new assistant professor and cultural anthropologist Kelly Fayard.

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Regina Huang
International Student Researches Colorado Internment Camp Museum

Regina Huang has done her thesis work on the Amache Museum, which holds the history of Colorado’s only Japanese American internment camp during World War II.

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